Thursday, April 3, 2014
mmkayn:

vastderp:

lalaland1212:

theatre-whovian:

vastderp:

Meet the Mona Lisa of the Prado, the earliest known copy of Da Vinci’s best portrait. Similarity in the undersketch of the painting indicates that this was very likely painted concurrently with the original Mona Lisa, by a student of Da Vinci.
There is much controversy in the art world over the question of whether or not to clean the fragile Mona Lisa, but her sister has been restored and some fairly odd later alterations removed to show the original vibrant colors and lighting. Some details, such as the sheerness of her shawl and the pattern on the neckline of her dress, have become utterly obscured in the original, but in the restored copy they’re perfectly clear.
It blows my mind a little bit to look at these two sisters side-by-side and imagine how much vivid detail could be hiding in the Mona Lisa under 500 years of rotten varnish. 

THE COPY HAS EYEBROWS

Your response to a beautiful piece of artwork done by Leonardo Da Vinci himself is “SHES GOT EYEBROWS”. Alright. All intelligent life has been lost.

Yo Snooty McSnotwhine, the Mona Lisa’s vanished eyebrows have been the subject of debate and analysis in the art expert community for hundreds of years, long before your parents squirted water at each other from across the clown car and then honked their bicycle horns to indicate they really wanted to make a smug, insufferable little clown baby together. 

this continues to be the best reply to a criticizing comment on this site

mmkayn:

vastderp:

lalaland1212:

theatre-whovian:

vastderp:

Meet the Mona Lisa of the Prado, the earliest known copy of Da Vinci’s best portrait. Similarity in the undersketch of the painting indicates that this was very likely painted concurrently with the original Mona Lisa, by a student of Da Vinci.

There is much controversy in the art world over the question of whether or not to clean the fragile Mona Lisa, but her sister has been restored and some fairly odd later alterations removed to show the original vibrant colors and lighting. Some details, such as the sheerness of her shawl and the pattern on the neckline of her dress, have become utterly obscured in the original, but in the restored copy they’re perfectly clear.

It blows my mind a little bit to look at these two sisters side-by-side and imagine how much vivid detail could be hiding in the Mona Lisa under 500 years of rotten varnish. 

THE COPY HAS EYEBROWS

Your response to a beautiful piece of artwork done by Leonardo Da Vinci himself is “SHES GOT EYEBROWS”. Alright. All intelligent life has been lost.

Yo Snooty McSnotwhine, the Mona Lisa’s vanished eyebrows have been the subject of debate and analysis in the art expert community for hundreds of years, long before your parents squirted water at each other from across the clown car and then honked their bicycle horns to indicate they really wanted to make a smug, insufferable little clown baby together. 

this continues to be the best reply to a criticizing comment on this site

(Source: that-darned-sock)

Thursday, March 27, 2014

prostheticknowledge:

Turbulence: Watercolor + Magic

First in a series of geometric watercolour paintings using an industrial robot arm, put together by Dr. Woohoo - video embedded below:

This is the first experiment by Dr. Woohoo in a series that explores the relationship between a robot + a artist with the objective of enhancing what is creatively possible by combining the strengths of each, while using watercolors as the natural media.

Music: Kid Koala

Wednesday, March 19, 2014

peteventers:

ctgraphy:

my-little-mod-blog:

This will not apply to all art professionals (and certainly should not be taken as good advice by some) but it won’t hurt them either. All this message has to do is help decrease the number of “I’ll pay you in publicity” offers from people who are trying to sell ice to [Inuit], so to speak. Maybe it might even result in a few more artists getting paid for their work?

"You don’t pay IN publicity, you pay FOR publicity."

*salutes*

Reblogging this for all my fellow freelancers!
(Unfortunately, we are unable to feed our cats in publicity.)

Oh, amen.

Also, damn cats, eat your publicity!

Wednesday, March 12, 2014

grumpiplier:

grumpiplier:

NO

THAT’S IT

YOU’VE GONE TOO FAR

Tuesday, March 4, 2014

allofthefeelings:

pheebadohdoh:

rewritingtheempire:

finally-breathing:

nonsensicalnoelle:

oscarwildeis-dead:

frosty-the-vegan:

tribecalledself:

Take note: Different forms of intimacy. 

I would feel so bad washing this off, holy shit

You could take a bath afterward with the artist and they can wash it off for you so you don’t feel responsible for their work. But also, it could teach the same kind of patience and concept that nothing lasts forever, similarly to the Tibetan Buddhist sand mandala tradition. And it could be just another step in your process of intimacy. Just a thought. 

I want to paint on someone holy shit.

Babe: You’re obligated to do this now. 

man, would love to have the type of friendship with people where we could all sit around topless, babes and dudes, and just paint on each other, and drink a little and laugh a lot

bolding last comment since not everything that looks intimate doesn’t really have to be

I think this is one of those times where it might be awesome to differentiate between “intimate” and “erotic”?

It can be totally intimate and still completely platonic. Human realtionships can be wonderful like that.

(Source: simplysimplifysimplicity)

Wednesday, February 5, 2014

Sometimes I see someone my age or younger than me who seems to be infinitely better than me at something I wanna be good at and I hate it because instead of working at it and improving I’ve let whatever potential I have go to waste and thats why they’re better than me.

But I know that I shouldn’t let me stop trying and I definitely know that it shouldn’t make me hate the person who is more proficient at it. Its difficult but I know that it should spur me on to do better myself.

Tuesday, January 28, 2014

ainawen-nurlaer:

The Desolation of Smaug — Art & Design

Sunday, January 26, 2014

sosuperawesome:

Mum draws the faces, daughter draws the bodies.. Lovely blog post about collaborative art here

Their print shop here

Monday, January 20, 2014

cimness:

kickingshoes:

artist-refs:

thepeoplesrepublicofheaven:

THANK YOU

I’m still confused ._.

Art Deco tends to have a lot of symmetric geometric shapes; triangles, half circles, sun bursts, lots of sharp angles and rich colors.The style was very good for architecture, which is why you see a lot more buildings in this style rather than paintings, jewelry or clothing (although art deco dresses are hella pretty). Some good examples of these are the Chrysler Building and the Empire State Building in New York.

Art Nouveau has a lot more flowing, organic shapes based on nature and our interactions with it. There’s a lot more asymmetry to this style, and a lot of hard and soft with stylized flowing hair and rendered ladies faces being a popular motif. Really the only repeating patterns are circles (often filled with flowers) and more muted colors.You’ll find a lot more jewelry, clothing and art in this style. I actually can’t think of an Art Nouveau building off the top of my head, although I can think of many stained glass panels.

The quintessential Art Nouveau artist is, in my opinion, Alphonse Mucha. If you want a good look at Nouveau, look at him.

I haven’t found a lot of artists in the Art Deco style that I like, but a lot of beautiful architecture came from that period. Bioshock was a really good game that used design from this period.

Hope this helps!

My favorite Art Deco art is Batman: The Animated Series.

(Just kidding. It’s really Poirot.)

And apparently the quintessential Nouveau architect was Gaudi:

And this is from Maison Victor Horta, “one of four Horta-designed town houses in Brussels that are together recognised by UNESCO as ‘representing the highest expression of the influential Art Nouveau style in art and architecture’ “(*):

(Source: antchubsa)

Monday, December 9, 2013
sarahvisualart:

kvelle:

Tree Drawings, Tim Knowles
“A series of drawings produced using drawing implements attached to the tips of tree branches, the wind’s effects on the tree recorded on paper. Like signatures each drawing reveals the different qualities and characteristics of each tree.”

This is art ok

sarahvisualart:

kvelle:

Tree DrawingsTim Knowles

“A series of drawings produced using drawing implements attached to the tips of tree branches, the wind’s effects on the tree recorded on paper. Like signatures each drawing reveals the different qualities and characteristics of each tree.”

This is art ok

(Source: apracticalintroduction)